Last edited by Taular
Friday, April 24, 2020 | History

8 edition of Trinity and creation in Augustine found in the catalog.

Trinity and creation in Augustine

an ecological analysis

by Scott A. Dunham

  • 122 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by State University of New York Press in Albany, NY .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Augustine, -- Saint, Bishop of Hippo,
  • Trinity -- History of doctrines,
  • Creation -- History of doctrines

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 181-189) and indexes.

    StatementScott A. Dunham.
    SeriesSUNY series on religion and the environment
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBR65.A9 D86 2008
    The Physical Object
    Paginationix, 198 p. ;
    Number of Pages198
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17095264M
    ISBN 100791475239
    ISBN 109780791475232
    LC Control Number2007038539


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Trinity and creation in Augustine by Scott A. Dunham Download PDF EPUB FB2

The first English-language book on Augustine’s Trinitarian doctrine of creation, The Trinity and Creation in Augustine explores Augustine’s relevance for contemporary environmental issues. Modern, environmentally conscious thinkers often see Augustine’s doctrines in a negative light, feeling they have been used to justify humankind’s Cited by: 5.

The Trinity and Creation in Augustine: An Ecological Analysis (Suny Series on Religion and the Environment Book ) - Kindle edition by Dunham, Scott A. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Trinity and Creation in Augustine: An Ecological Analysis (Suny Series on Religion and 3/5(1). Looks at Augustine’s theology in light of environmental concerns. The first English-language book on Augustine’s Trinitarian doctrine of creation, The Trinity and Creation in Augustine explores Augustine’s relevance for contemporary environmental issues.

Modern, environmentally conscious thinkers often see Augustine’s doctrines in a negative light, feeling they have been used to. Augustine (A.D. ), the “Doctor of Grace” from north Africa, is arguably the most significant theologian in the Western tradition.

He had once been a Manichee, during which time he would have affirmed a kind of good vs. evil dualism, as well as seeing matter as. Trinity and Creation in Augustine, The: An Ecological Analysis - Ebook written by Scott A.

Dunham. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Trinity and Creation in Augustine, The: An Ecological Analysis.

S cott D unham aims in this book to recover St Augustine’s interrelated doctrines of the Trinity and of creation so Trinity and creation in Augustine book he can fruitfully relate them to modern ecological concerns. The teachings must be recovered because they have been misrepresented in much twentieth-century dogmatic theology, in particular that of Jürgen Moltmann, Leonardo Boff, and Colin : Richard Finn.

Augustine identifies these qualities of the Trinity with qualities of human beings, reinforcing Augustine's notion that humanity is created in the spiritual image of God. J.J. O'Donnell and other scholars have noted that the Trinity also serves as a structural element for the last three books of the Confessions: B with its contrasts.

Introduction. In the Retractations (ii. 15) Augustine speaks of this work in the following terms:— I spent some years in writing fifteen books concerning the Trinity, which ishowever, I had not yet finished the thirteenth Book, and some who were exceedingly anxious to have the work were kept waiting longer than they could bear, it was stolen from me in a less correct state than it.

Augustine's work on the Trinity truly illustrates the definition of the work "classic": a book much discussed but never read, either by his adherents or critics.

To be fair, even Augustine's adherents admit his style could be improved--shortening passages and limiting some of the more fanciful exegesis (City of God is notorious in this regard)/5. All of creation is a function of the goodness of God, he explains, and God made creation out of the abundance of that goodness.

The Trinity is touched upon - specifically, the Spirit moving over the waters in Genesis - and Augustine confirms the three-in-one nature (a mystery) of God. The Trinity and Creation in Augustine: An Ecological Analysis Scott A. Dunham The first English-language book on Augustine’s Trinitarian doctrine of creation, The Trinity and Creation in Augustine explores Augustine’s relevance for contemporary environmental issues.

Augustine pursues his defense of the equality of the Trinity; and in treating of the sending of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and of the various appearances of God, demonstrates that He who is sent is not therefore less than He who sends, because the one has sent, the other has been sent; but that the Trinity, being in all things equal, and alike in its own nature unchangeable and invisible.

Confessions (Latin: Confessiones) is the name of an autobiographical work, consisting of 13 books, by Saint Augustine of Hippo, written in Latin between and AD.

The work outlines Saint Augustine's sinful youth and his conversion to English translations of it are sometimes published under the title The Confessions of Saint Augustine in order to distinguish the book. Saint Augustine’s Prayer Book during seminary, and, like many Episcopalians, lay and ordained, I found it had much to teach me as the book became a constant companion over the years.

I accepted the responsibility of editing a new version with genuine affection. There is a great deal of substantial and helpful material here, andFile Size: KB. Augustine’s Understanding of Creation In relation to the persons of the Trinity, Augustine uses creatioin a more specificsense to refer to the Father bringing formless matter into being from nothing.

occur in Book Seven when he comes to the proper distinction between God and the world. standing (Isaiah ).

Augustine cites scriptural bases for the doctrine of the Trinity and its image in man and woman. 7 The first seven books focus on the doc-trine of the Trinity established from scripture and the philosophical concepts used to prevent misunderstanding. The last eight books deal with an investiga.

Augustine refers to the Trinity in De civitate Dei X a; XI, 1 0 and XI. lt is the last of these passages which is the most important. because in it Augustine expounds his understanding of the image of God In man as the image of the Trinity, a theme which had already occupied him in De trinitate andFile Size: KB.

Augustine’s typical dialectic is to move from the exterior realities of creation to the interior reality of the human soul where he hoped to encounter God in the image of God, damaged as it is by the fall.

Further, his dialectic is guided by the particular consideration of what true love is: a trinity of lover, beloved and the love that binds. In On Christian Doctrine, Book I Augustine explains the Threeness yet Oneness in similar terms, noting how the different Persons are relationally different in what they provide to the Godhead as a whole: The Trinity, one God, of whom are all things, through whom are all things, in whom are all things.

Augustine, that great man of God, was once walking on the shore of an ocean while greatly perplexed about the doctrine of the trinity. As he meditated, he observed a little boy with a seashell running back and forth from the waters edge, filling his shell, and then pouring it into a crab hole in the sand.

InNew City Press, in conjunction with the Augustinian Heritage Institute, began the project knows as: The Works of Saint Augustine, A Translation for the 21st Century. The plan is to translate and publish all works of Saint Augustine, his entire corpus into modern English.

This represents the first time in which The Works of Saint Augustine will all be translated into English.2/5(1). However, Augustine was not this callous of a logician. The Spirit is the Gift of the Father because of Johnwhich Augustine in Book 4 Par 29 tells us means that “ the Father is the beginning (principium) of the whole divinity.” In other words, He is the Father’s Gift because the Gift originates from the Father.

God remains unchangeable, eternal, and unified, and creation always seeks (whether it realizes it or not) to return to God. Here, Augustine has argued that even sin itself fundamentally aims at a return to God.

[II] Book II ends with a consideration of the peer pressure on which Augustine partly blames the theft of the pears. The main. Augustine of Hippo (–) strongly influenced western theology, but he has often been accused of over-emphasizing the unity of God to the detriment of the Trinity.

In Augustine and the Trinity, Lewis Ayres offers a new treatment of this important figure, demonstrating how Augustine's writings offer one of the most sophisticated early.

Augustine "coupled the doctrine of the Trinity with anthropology. Proceeding from the idea that humans are created by God according to the divine image, he attempted to explain the mystery of the Trinity by uncovering traces of the Trinity in the human personality".

[89]. BOOK THIRTEEN. The mysteries and allegories of the days of creation. Augustine undertakes to interpret Gen. in a mystical and allegorical fashion so as to exhibit the profundities of God's power and wisdom and love.

He is also interested in developing his theories of. Augustine - St. Augustine - Christian Doctrine: De doctrina christiana (Books I–III, /, Book IV, ; Christian Doctrine) was begun in the first years of Augustine’s episcopacy but finished 30 years later. This imitation of Cicero’s Orator for Christian purposes sets out a theory of the interpretation of Scripture and offers practical guidance to the would-be preacher.

Again, Augustine reads this description of the initial creation as covering only 'heaven of heaven and formless matter.' [XII] The remainder of Book XII is primarily a response not to Manichee critics--a position which Augustine spent considerable time denouncing--but rather to Catholic critics of Augustine's very figurative reading of.

Augustine provides an especially likely case for such a study because one finds a considerable amount of overlapping material between the De Trinitate and the City of God. There is an extensive discussion of the Trinity itself in Book 11 of the City of God with significant follow-up in File Size: KB.

Augustine of Hippo (/ ɔː ˈ ɡ ʌ s t ɪ n /; 13 November – 28 August AD), also known as Saint Augustine, Aurelius Augustinus Hipponensis and Augustinus, was a Roman African, Manichaean, early Christian theologian, doctor of the Church, and Neoplatonic philosopher from Numidia whose writings influenced the development of the Western Church and Western philosophy, and indirectly all Born: 13 November AD, Thagaste, Numidia.

i.e. creation, sanctification, etc.), but this posed its own set of problems. o InAugustine’s friend Nebridius had asked: If the Trinity does everything together in unity, how is it that the Son becomes incarnate, but not the Father and the Holy Spirit.

(Augustine responded briefly in Ep. Augustine on the Trinity. I) Persons as Relations Augustine’s goal is to not to prove the doctrine the Trinity given his presupposition that faith precedes understanding and that understanding must inform faith.

His ‘De Trinitate’ represents an exercise in understanding what it means to say that God is at the same time Unity in Trinity and Trinity in Unity. Get this from a library. The Trinity and creation in Augustine: an ecological analysis. [Scott A Dunham] -- "The first English-language book on Augustine's Trinitarian doctrine of creation, The Trinity and Creation in Augustine explores Augustine's relevance for contemporary environmental issues.

Modern. Augustine: namely, creation, understood in a broad sense. Following St. Paul, Augustine thinks that creation is a revelation (cf.

Rom. ); it is that which reveals the truth about God and the world. For Augustine, creation is not one doctrine or theme among others, but is the foundational context for all doctrines and all themes.

Book 10 is a discussion of the nature of memory and an examination of the temptations Augustine was still facing.

Books 11 through 13 are an extended exegesis of the first chapter of Genesis. The sharp differences between these three parts have raised many questions about the unity of the Confessions. InAndrew Dickson White, then president of newly founded Cornell University, gave a lecture entitled 'The Battle-Fields Of Science' in the great hall of New York’s Cooper Union He argued that science had been constantly engaged in a great war with religion, particularly Christianity, and that the progress of scientific truths was constantly and invariably impeded by the interests of.

Since even Augustine would know that the Greek version of the phrase could indicate not merely circumstance but even instrument ("by means of the beginning"), it was easy to assume that the deeper sense of the opening line revealed the three persons of the trinity were actively present in the act of creation from the outset.

Augustine wrote: "It is necessary that we, viewing the Creator through the works of his hands, raise up our minds to the contemplation of the Trinity, of which creation bears the mark in a certain and due proportion".

It is a truth of faith that the world has its beginning in the creator, who is the Triune God. Aquinas on the image of the Trinity in creation. Aquinas here is standing on the foundation laid by St.

Augustine in his masterpiece, De Trinitate. Augustine proposes that we can understand the Trinity by way of analogy with ourselves. By looking within, we can see the image of God reflected, which can become a means of knowing God. Thomas L. Humphries Jr.

on Chad Tyler Gerber’s The Spirit of Augustine’s Early Theology Chad Tyler Gerber, The Spirit of Augustine’s Early Theology, Ashgate Publishing,pp., $ Saint Augustine of Hippo was a latecomer to Christianity.

He joined the Church during a period of deepening articulation of the Trinity. Quotes from the Early Church Fathers: Man in God’s image and the Trinity The Church Fathers, Tertullian and Augustine both explained the trinity in regards to man being created in the image of God.

Their explanation was not like modern day explanations that teach man is body, soul, and spirit. Augustine of Hippo (–) strongly influenced western theology, but he has often been accused of over-emphasizing the unity of God to the detriment of the Trinity. In Augustine and the Trinity, Lewis Ayres offers a new treatment of this important figure, demonstrating how Augustine's writings offer one of the most sophisticated early theologies of the Trinity developed after the Council 5/5(2).(Augustine’s analogy of love from Book 8 of de Trinitate is another example.

It is very useful to the Apologetics of Love!) It is very useful to the Apologetics of Love!) This naturally leads to a better understanding of creation and of the human being in particular.